Tag Archives: Chapter 13

Chapter 13 Bankruptcy: Liquidation Analysis

In a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy, if you are unable to exempt all of your assets, you will need to perform a liquidation analysis (LA).  The purpose of a liquidation analysis is to ensure the general unsecured creditors are receiving at least the amount they would be receiving if the unexempted assets were liquidated in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. As such, cost of sale, trustee’s compensation, and priority debts are to be taken into consideration.

For example, let’s say that a client has $5,000 in unexempted assets and owes $1,500 to the IRS. Under this scenario, the Chapter 7 trustee’s fee would be 25%, reducing the amount to be actually distributed to $3,750. Of that, the first $1,500 will go to the priority class of creditors (IRS), leaving the remaining amount of $2,250 available for the general unsecured creditors. Therefore, $2,250 would be the result from the LA.

If we were dealing with a home where some of the equity is not able to be exempted, you may also deduct the cost of sale, typically 6% of the FMV.

For more questions about Bankruptcy or the Liquidation Analysis, please give us a call at (616) 920-0555.

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Chapter 13 Bankruptcy: What is a Cramdown?

 A “cramdown” essentially reduces the principal balance of a secured debt from the outstanding loan amount down to the Fair Market Value. This is most often used with car loans, mobile home loans, household goods, and other personal property in a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy. This will allow an individual to pay the fair value of the property and the remaining balance would be lumped into other unsecured debt.

The most common example is a vehicle, if the vehicle is work $6,000 but there is a $13,000 loan on the vehicle, the individual would be required to pay the $6,000 as secured debt and the remaining $7,000 would be seen as unsecured debt which would be paid in proportion to all other unsecured debt. Any portion of the unsecured debt that was still due and owing on the loan would be discharged at the end of the bankruptcy.

The huge benefit of cramming down the loan is to be able to reduce interest rates, reduce the amount owed, stretch payments out over a longer term, and lower the monthly obligation. This “cramdown” is allowed in Chapter 13 cases, as opposed to a Chapter 7. In order to utilize this process, the loan must have been acquired at least 910 days prior to the bankruptcy. This way, an individual who goes out and buys a new car and acquires a loan cannot turn around and file for bankruptcy in order to lower the loan.

If you have questions about this process, or if you want to know what Russell can do for you, feel free to give us a call at (616) 920-0555.

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Chapter 13 Bankruptcy: Examples of Disposable Income

Disposable Income in the bankruptcy world will be whatever is left over after taxes, insurance, and any necessary household expenses. This disposable income must then be turned over to the Chapter 13 trustee.

However, there are additional forms of income that can come into when calculating disposable income:

  • Bonuses – If these were not already factored into the Schedule I, then the funds must be turned over to the trustee. However, one can submit an application to retain.
  • Tax Refunds – This is the most common form of “disposable income” that is turned over to the trustee. However, please review our article on how you can keep you tax refunds.
  • Inheritance – The amount deemed disposable could be reduced by available exemptions
  • Life Insurance Proceeds – The amount deemed disposable could be reduced by available exemptions

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Chapter 13 Bankruptcy: Can I Keep My Tax Refunds?

Short answer, yes, as long as the paperwork is handled correctly.

In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, tax refunds are treated as disposable income, and as stated in other articles, by default all disposable income is to be turned over to the trustee. However, the following are the most common avenues we take to ensure our clients are able to retain some, or all of their tax refunds.

Application to Retain:  If a client has unexpected expenses, not already accounted for in their budget, we often submit an application with the trustee’s office to retain some or all of their refund.  Examples of this is home repairs, vehicle repairs, vehicle replacement, and post-petition medical expenses. We sit down for a meeting which takes approximately 30 minutes, we review the tax returns, and documentation for these unexpected expenses and submit the application that day. Often, we can have the refund request approved within a week.

100% Plan:  Bankruptcy plans where the client is already paying their creditors back at 100% are automatically approved to retain 100%  of their refund. However, clients may turn over some or all of their refund in order to reduce their plan length.

More than 36 months into a 36-month ACP Plan:  A 36-ACP is a case where the client passed the Means Test, but decided to file a Chapter 13 for another reason. In those cases, after the client successfully completed 36 months of their plan, the client is able to keep any future disposable income.

Built into Budget: Clients can list a proration of their tax refund on their Schedule I. For example, the client can list “ProRated Tax Refunds” under miscellaneous income for the amount of $500. By doing so, the client automatically gets to retain $6,000 from each tax refund. If they need to keep more, they may submit an Application to Retain with the trustee.

 

If you have questions about this process, or if you want to know what Russell can do for you, feel free to give us a call at (616) 920-0555.

 

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Retaining Nonexempt Property in Chapter 7 Cases

In consumer chapter 7 bankruptcies, although the trustee pretty clearly has a right to take possession of totally nonexempt property prior to the 341 meeting of creditors, this rarely occurs. These non-exempt issues can be resolved in one of three fashions.: (1) Turn the property over to the trustee; (2) Buy the non-exempt property back from the trustee; (3) file a Chapter 13, perform a liquidation analysis and account for that L.A. in your plan.

In the second option, the client would only need to buy back the non-exempt portion. For example, the debtor’s automobile may be worth $1,000 more than the amount which can be exempted. In these circumstances, terms can be arranged for a payment to the trustee in lieu of turning over the car. As long as the case will not be delayed, the trustee should be willing to accept payment in installments.

Give us a call at (616) 920-0555 for information on our $999.00 Flat-Fee Bankruptcy Service where you can get started with only $500.00 down.

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